Saturday, March 28, 2015

Richard Schiffman: "Late March"

















Again the trees remembered
to make leaves.
In the forest of their recollection
many birds returned
singing.
They sang, they sang
because they forgave themselves
the winter, and all that remained
still bitter.
Yet it was early spring,
when the days were touch and go,
and a late snow could nip a shoot,
or freeze a fledgling in its nest.
And where would we be then?
But that’s not the point.
Do you think the magpie doesn’t know
that its chicks are at risk,
or the peach trees, their too-frail blossoms,
the new-awakened bees, all that is
incipient within us?
We know, but we can’t help ourselves
any more than they can,
any more than the earth can
stop hurtling through the night
of its own absence.
Must be something in the sap,
the blood, a force like gravity,
a trick called memory.
You name it. Or leave it nameless
that’s better—
how something returns
and keeps on returning
through a gap,
through a dimensional gate,
through a tear in the veil.
And there it is again.
Another spring.
To woo loss into song.



"Late March" by Richard Schiffman, from Grey Sparrow Journal (Winter, 2015). Presented here by poet submission.

Art credit: Photograph of Australian magpie-lark chicks by Stephen Michael Barnett from Darwin, Australia.

 

1 comment :

  1. Thank you for this lovely reminder!

    ReplyDelete

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